Eureka an essay on the material and spiritual universe

I grasped it with my soul -- I reached it through mere dint of intuition. But as, on the summit of AEtna, no man has thought of whirling on his heel, so no man has ever taken into his brain the full uniqueness of the prospect; and so, again, whatever considerations lie involved in this uniqueness, have as yet no practical existence for mankind.

Man neither employs, nor knows, a force sufficient to bring two atoms into contact. I maintain, secondly, that these conditions themselves have been imposed upon me, as necessities, in a train of ratiocination as rigorously logical as that which establishes any demonstration in Euclid; and I maintain, thirdly, that even if the charge of "hypothesis" were as fully sustained as it is, in fact, unsustained and untenable, still the validity and indisputability of my result would not, even in the slightest particular, be disturbed.

I refer simply to the "utmost conceivable expanse" of space -- a shadowy and fluctuating domain, now shrinking, now swelling, in accordance with the vacillating energies of the imagination.

For convenience of illustration, let us imagine, in the first place, a hollow sphere of glass, or of anything else, occupying the space throughout which the universal matter is to be thus equally diffused, by means of irradiation, from the absolute, irrelative, unconditional particle, placed in the centre of the sphere.

Undoubtedly, therefore, we should be warranted in assuming all that has been mentioned, but for the reflection, first, that supererogation is not presumable of any Divine Act; and, secondly, that the object supposed in view, appears as feasible when some of the conditions in question are dispensed with, in the beginning, as when all are understood immediately to exist.

In other words, the number of atoms lying upon the surface of any one of the concentric spheres, is directly proportional with the extent of that surface.

We have now the sphere filled, through means of irradiation, with atoms equably diffused. Poe's friend Evert A.

Eureka : an essay on the material and spiritual universe

I am proudly aware that there exist many of the most profound and cautiously discriminative human intellects which cannot help being abundantly content with my -- suggestions. Among the vanishing minutiae, in a survey of this kind, would be all exclusively terrestrial matters.

Their source lies in the principle, Unity. For example, Poe uses more metaphors further into the work in the belief that the reader becomes more interested.

By its means, investigation has been taken out of the hands of the ground-moles, and given as a duty, rather than as a task, to the true -- to the only true thinkers -- to the generally-educated men of ardent imagination. These latter -- our Keplers -- our Laplaces -- 'speculate' -- 'theorize' -- these are the terms -- can you not fancy the shout of scorn with which they would be received by our progenitors, were it possible for them to be looking over my shoulders as I write?

Finity -- the Finite. Referring to the Newtonian Gravity, Dr. But their certainty was very far from absolute. The sole answer is this: Kepler admitted that these laws he guessed -- these laws whose investigation disclosed to the greatest of British astronomers that principle, the basis of all existing physical principle, in going behind which we enter at once the nebulous kingdom of Metaphysics.

That a tree can be both a tree and not a tree, is an idea which the angels, or the devils, may entertain, and which no doubt many an earthly Bedlamite, or Transcendentalist, does. I mean to say that some are involved in the rest, or so instantaneous a consequence of them as to make the distinction inappreciable.

Difference is their character -- their essentiality -- just as no-difference was the essentiality of their course.

He started with what he maintained to be axioms, or self-evident truths: I have now lying before me" -- it will be observed that we still proceed with the letter -- "I have now lying before me a book printed about a thousand years ago. By Him, however -- now, at least, the Incomprehensible -- by Him -- assuming him as Spirit -- that is to say, as not Matter -- a distinction which, for all intelligible purposes, will stand well instead of a definition -- by Him, then, existing as Spirit, let us content ourselves, to-night, with supposing to have been created, or made out of Nothing, by dint of his Volition -- at some point of Space which we will take as a centre -- at some period into which we do not pretend to inquire, but at all events immensely remote -- by Him, then again, let us suppose to have been created -- what?

In other words, we have reached the conclusion that, on the hypothesis that matter was originally irradiated from a centre and is now returning to it, the concentralization, in the return, proceeds exactly as we know the force of gravitation to proceed.

Eureka : an essay on the material and spiritual universe

In a word, while the mode of Aries rested on noumena, that of Hog depended on phenomena; and so great was the admiration excited by this latter system that, at its first introduction, Aries fell into general disrepute.

In the beginning, let me as distinctly as possible announce—not the theorem which I hope to demonstrate—for, whatever the mathematicians may assert, there is, in this world at least, no such thing as demonstration—but the ruling idea which, throughout this volume, I shall be continually endeavoring to suggest.eureka: an essay on the material and spiritual universe () is a lengthy work by American author (–) which he subtitled "A ", though it has also been.

EUREKA: AN ESSAY ON THE MATERIAL AND SPIRITUAL UNIVERSE. IT is with humility really unassumed -- it is with a sentiment even of awe -- that I pen the opening sentence of this work: for of all conceivable subjects I approach the reader with the most solemn -- the most comprehensive -- the most difficult -- the most august.

an essay on the material and spiritual universe IT is with humility really unassumed -- it is with a sentiment even of awe -- that I pen the opening sentence of this work: for of all conceivable subjects I approach the reader with the most solemn -- the most comprehensive -- the most difficult --.

Buy Eureka: An Essay on the Material and Spiritual Universe on currclickblog.com FREE SHIPPING on qualified orders/5(7). Aug 15,  · an essay on the material and spiritual universe.

I T is with humility really unassumed — it is with a sentiment even of awe — that I pen the opening sentence of this work: for of all conceivable subjects I approach the reader with the most solemn — the most comprehensive — the most difficult — the most august.

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Eureka an essay on the material and spiritual universe
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